Mother’s Day: Celebrating Unconditional Love

By: 
TR Staff
Staff Writer

By Ellie Boese
treditor@times-online.com
The United States Census Bureau says that around 82.5 million people are mothers. Additionally, 55% of American women tackled mothering infant children while also being in the workforce in 2002, and 5.4 million were stay-at-home moms.
As with almost all other holidays, Mother’s Day celebrations date back to Ancient cultures. Greeks, with their many pagan Gods, celebrated a unique Mother’s Day by honoring the mother of the gods, Rhea. Ancient Romans celebrated their own deity, Cybele, a mother goddess. The British Isles and Celtic Europe populations dedicated their own days to the goddess Brigid in the spring.
Anna Jarvis is credited with beginning America’s embodiment of Mother’s Day in 1908, a holiday officially incorporated in the US calendar year in 1914.
Today, Americans honor the holiday by presenting mothers and motherly figures, spouses, grandmothers and others with things like flowers, chocolate and special meals (which mothers don’t have to cook, for once).
The challenges that come with being a mother don’t end when children start sleeping through the night (though it’s a bonus). If you’ve ever had a 2-year-old or teenager, you know what I mean.
There are also those who we might not consider on Mother’s Day, though there are many forms of “motherhood.” Perhaps an aunt has taken a child under their wings, a caring teacher, siblings who have taken on that role, neighbors, a friend’s mother. Maybe cousins, grandmothers, mothers-in-law, single fathers, spiritual mothers. There are many forms of “motherhood,” all worthy of being celebrated.
We also remember that, for some, the holiday may be difficult. Those who have lost their mothers or motherly figures, who experience infertility and the inability to have their own children, who have lost children and suffer other hardships are worthy to be recognized as well.
The holiday encompasses honoring all mothers and motherly figures and others who wish to be so. We celebrate them for all they do to love, care for and protect.

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